Home Again, Home Again

“Home is the place where, when you get there, they have to take you in.” – Robert Frost

“The ornament of a house is the friends who frequent it.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Over this past summer, I returned to my hometown, Parkersburg. My wife and I were having our first baby, and home seemed the best place to be. We were surrounded by family and friends, and visited places that are so familiar.

Before going to West Virginia, though, we stayed a few nights in New York, New York. It was the first time for me to explore the “City that Never Sleeps”. It was fun, seeing the sites and sights that everyone expects of us. In addition, we went through Manhattan, getting lost – finding those places one only finds when they are well and truly lost.

We found several local restaurants and shops hidden among the larger storefronts. We found a few foreign shops and goodies hidden down alleys. It was fun seeing the hidden side of NYC. Of course, there were things we got to see that were more major. We circled Central Park, climbed the Empire State Building, took a cruise to see Lady Liberty.

The weather was cold, but Spring was definitely visiting. The flowers were blooming everywhere, especially in the parks. The trees were budding, and the young animals were frolicking. We enjoyed our time adventuring in the Big Apple, despite the chill in the wind.

Once we arrived in my hometown, however, Spring had given Winter the boot. The weather was brighter and warmer. Everything was vibrant, green, and growing. The flowers in the fields had started blooming. Life ruled all. My wife and I visitied our family farm and many local places within my hometown.


We visited a Revolutionary War fort – Fort Boreman – and the park that now sits on that hilltop. The park overlooks the old B&O Railroad crossing of the Ohio River, the old factory district of Parkersburg, and the connection of the Ohio River with the Little Kanawha River. We also visited Wheeling, St Martinsburg, and Moundsville. There were lots of things to see in these cities, but the biggest attraction was the penitentiary in Moundsville.

The Moundsville Penitentiary has a shaky history that can be traced back over 100 years, starting as holding and execution place during the Civil War. After that, it slowly developed as a prison. There were several additions over the years, and eventually it became a national penitentiary. It had a morbid fascination and cruel feeling to it. Inmates were kept three to a room, in a cell that could barely hold 2. The worst of the inmates were kept in the cells for 23 hours a day. There is a framed letter from Charles Manson currently hanging in the penitentiary. Supposedly, it was so renowned, that he asked the Governor of West Virginia if he could be transferred.

It wouldn’t be a decent blog post if I did not talk about food. While we were back in my hometown, we tried to cook both healthily and some food like we would eat in China. We did a fairly decent job at making things healthy – seared tuna, quinoa stuffed peppers, channa masala, and grilled salmon. We also made some more traditional chinese dishes – dumplings, noodles, kebobs, and hot pot. We ate very well.

When my wife’s parents came from Xi’an to Parkersburg, we took them to explore the state. We went to the Blennerhasset Island, where the mansion of the Blennerhassets (a prominent British family) now sits. It was shipped all the way from England to the United States and then brought down the rivers to the island. We also went into the mountains to visit some of the important places in Appalachia. We visited Seneca Rocks, Canaan Valley, Little Mountain, and Blackwater Falls, as well as many of the small towns in between. It was good to see my state again, and even better to share it with my wife, in-laws, and newborn son. We also took my in-laws shooting, something the have never done. They said they enjoyed and seemed to have fun with the guns, despite having never held or seen one before.

The last stop we made this summer was Washington D.C. We had to go get our son’s registration to leave the country and enter China. We took a few days to explore the capital too. We saw the White House, the capitol, the monuments, the Smithsonian Museums, and the Metropolitan Zoo. We also discovered a few ethnic food stores where we were able to buy supplies for our cooking authentic food.

We had a great several months, spending time with family and friends. We saw places that were familiar to me, but new to my wife and son. We got to spend so much time together and start my son’s life right.


Land of Enlightenment

“It is better to travel than to arrive.” – Buddha

At the beginning of my second year in China, I had the opportunity to travel to the mystical regions of Yunnan and Tibet. They hold the heart of modern Buddhism, and I was not disappointed in my exposure to unique culture. We were able to visit Lijiang and Shangri-La. Both mountain cities were beautiful, full of wonderful people and traditions, and hosted many activities and different types of foods.

We began our journey in Lijiang, in the heart of the mountains in Yunnan. The hotel was in Lijiang Old Town. It was a beautiful traditional Yunnan building, and because we went in the low season, we had the hotel to ourselves. Old Town itself was a large labyrinthian village filled with quaint homes and lovely shops. The smell of flowers and baked goods wafted through the streets. The runoff from the mountains run through the streets.

We spent the first day exploring Lijiang and trying local food. The next day, we were able to climb the local tall peaks of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountains. They were breath-taking. We walked to the middle level of the mountains, then the lifts took us to the peaks. From there, we were able to climb to the top. We were able to see across all of Yunnan from that height – 5200m (16000ft). The wind and clouds played across the top, and I felt exhilarated to have climbed to the top with my wife.

After the peaks, we were able to explore to springs created by the runoff from the mountain ice and snow. The pools were gorgeous. The streams and rivers collect and serve an entire area of Yunnan around the mountains. The locals gather have held these pools and streams in high esteem for centuries. They have a tradition of hanging prayer bells and prayer flags (flags and bells with prayers on them) – the idea being they will pray on your behalf. These are always hung in sacred places, such as the peaks and pools of the mountains.

I was able to see many mountain traditions while in Yunnan. Traditional dance was something that many locals know. Many of the locals display these dances in shows for tourists. Another tradition is sending candles in lotus flowers down the rivers as prayers. Today, locals and tourists alike send paper lotuses down the streams as both prayers and a tradition of those prayers. We also discovered a wonderful small Irish pub hidden in the rock walls, called Stone the Crows. It is run by an Irishman, and sells traditional pub-fare with Guinness on tap.

Our next stop on this trip was Shangri-La, the mystical mountain village nestled between Yunnan and Tibet. Shangri-La was exactly what I expected and exactly not what I expected. It was both ancient and modern, mystical and practical, sacred and ordinary. The old village of Shangri-La was dozens of miles from the temples that most people know. The old village was also ghostly, as it was off-season, and frigid even in daytime. We were able to see one of the largest prayer wheels in world. A prayer wheel is similar to the prayer bells and prayer flags, it has prayers that are sent when you spin the wheel. We also sampled Tibetan food that made me love the highlands even more. We had barley bread, butter tea, and an assortment of other dishes and soups.

The temples of Shangri-La were a sacred marvel. There are 108 separate buildings in the temple complex on the hilltop. We walked through all of the open temples. We lit a prayer candle. We were even blessed by a monk and given prayer beads. It was an enlightening experience. I felt that I had felt one more part of the world, one more part of humanity.

Although I have enjoyed all of my trips through China, I loved my trip to Lijiang and Shangri-La. The food, the sights, the people, and the traditions that we were able to see and take part were wholly awesome and life-changing. I fully intend on us returning sometime with our son.




Christmas in the Orient

“‘Maybe Christmas,’ thought the Grinch, ‘doesn’t come from a store.'” – Dr. Seuss

In this short post, I want to share my experiences with the Winter holidays in China. I had originally thought that the western holidays, especially those religious holidays, would not be observed in China. I presumed that the Chinese would not share the festivities or music or decorations or food. In fact, Christmas does take place in China, if maybe not quite the same as here.

The first thing I experienced during the Christmas season was a cooking lesson. To be more specific, it was my wife’s and my fourth baking master class. These classes are taught once a month in the Kempenski Hotel Restaurant by the world renowned Chef Joachim, a Swiss Master Chef and Baker. We had the honor of taking his Christmas cooking class, where we learned to make trifle, Christmas pudding, and spice meringue.

Beginning in early December, many prominent sites in Beijing began to aire their Christmas décor and lights. We were able to see some really great light displays. There were Christmas trees and lightings, parties, choirs singing carols, and many other festivities. One of my favorite was the grand Christmas dinner at the Sofitel Wanda resorts. It was an eleven course Christmas dinner, featuring sea slug, duck heart, and nine-layer tripe. There were two other nice banquets – one at Langham Place and another at Novitel Xingquio Hotel. The food and music at both were quite enjoyable.

The month culminated in me celebrating a private Yuletide feast with a group of my friends. Although the apartment was small, we were not stopped from having a large gathering with a Winter goose and other dishes from around the world – like mushroom lasagna and chicken curry. We exchanged gifts playing Dirty Santa, a game that involves stealing presents from each other.

It was a terrific holiday season, and I thoroughly enjoyed my time sharing the holidays with such wonderful friends!

Spine of the Dragon

“But it is one thing to read about dragons and another to meet them.” – Ursula K. Le Guin

The Great Wall. It is one thing to call it great, to see it in pictures, to hear about it from travelers. It is quite another thing to see it for yourself. The Great Wall is well and truly great. I was able to go there, to see it, smell it, run my hand along millennia of powerful history. I was in awe of its magnitude.

In October, my wife and I had the second part of our honeymoon. We left Beijing and travelled north to Badaling, an area rich in history, including still standing sections of the Great Wall. We stayed at The Commune, a lodging village in the mountains, nestled among the broken edges of the preserved wall.

There were many sections of the Great Wall. The place we were able to see first was a private wall behind the village. There were only a handful of people visiting, and we were able to take great pictures of ourselves there. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity.

In addition to the wall, the village had a wildlife area and forest enveloping it. It gave it a very remote feeling, which is not something you get China. The village featured large buildings with several rooms sharing common rooms and kitchens. The lodge had a very nice restaurant.

Badaling has many historical sites. Another famous spot, however, is the Badaling Safari. There are many wild animals, such as lions, bears, monkeys that can roam freely in large areas in which visitors drive through. It is a unique twist to the normal zoo experience. For once, the humans are the ones in cages. Caged buses take patrons through the safari, allowing them to see the animals up and close. There is also a larger section with less dangerous animals. Tourists can walk through that area.

I was able to try traditional mountain food. This included black chicken, spicy beans, and flat bread. The food had a wild taste that I loved. The spice, as always, is one of my favorite parts of Chinese cuisine.

Later in October, we were able to celebrate our annual Halloween fright night in Beijing. In the far south of Beijing is a theme park called Happy Valley Park. They have their own version of Horror Nights that was actually fun and enjoyable, complete with their own haunted houses. The park included a traditional form of drama acting that told history in a satirical way. It is another must if you are in Beijing!

In Novemember, we flew across the small pond to South Korea. More specifically, we visited Jeju Island. It was surprisingly modern and westernized. I enjoyed the mix of Korean food and western business fronts. The island was built around a long dormant volcano that now serves as a wildlife park. The park was beautiful and holds its own treasures, including fairly tame animals and ancient burial mounds.

As my year was closing, I was contented that I had already visited three countries in Southeast Asia, along with several parts of China. I enjoy traveling, and I hope that through this blog I can share my travels and stoke a fire of your own.

Celebrating Autumn

“There is not enough celebration of companionship.” – Franscesca Annis

In September, I once again traveled to Xi’an. This time, I was able to partake in the Mid-Autumn Festival. In China, the Mid-Autumn Festival marks the end of Summer and the beginning of harvest. There are sets of traditions and rites as with the Chinese formal holidays. The main needs for this festival were moon cakes. Moon cakes are small, thick pastries filled with mixtures of fruits, nuts, and beans along with eggs and cream for some.

The other focus of this holiday is eating fruits and nuts harvested in Autumn. There were several types of nuts, along with apples, dates, and pears. I spent time with my wife’s family, which is another necessity for Chinese holidays. We spent our holiday in the Wild Goose Pagoda park. The park is beautiful, with monuments commemorating times and people in China’s history.

Later, I was able to visit the Li Mountain outside of Xi’an. It was once a mountainside spa resort for the emperor’s concubines. It was also the place of retreat for Jiang Jieshi, the leader of the main political parties. He fled from Mao Tsedong during the Chinese revolution with money and artifacts. Eventually, he left the mountain for Taiwan. Now the mountain is a tourist spot and a reminder of the struggle of early modern China.

The resort still contains the old stone baths from the ancient times, as well as many fruit and nut trees used by the consorts. The view from the top of the mountain was breathtaking. There were also many temple spots and political memorials along the mountainside.

The other focus of that trip to Xi’an was the Muslim Street. I mentioned the street before, but I do not believe I did it justice. It is definitely one of the main attractions within the city of Xi’an. There were all kinds of food and crafts sold and made right there in the street. I was amazed most by the foods. Taffees and other wonderful candies are made fresh daily and sold along the street. Breads, meats, tofus, drinks, desserts, and soups can also be found, especially if you know where to look.

The last stop for me during this trip was to the Bell Tower and Drum Tower of Xi’an. These towers are traditional buildings in most large cities in China. Xi’an, once Changan, holds one of the oldest sets of towers in China. The towers were used in ceremonies throughout the year, signaling the changes in season. Today, they are still used in their traditional manner.

As I have mentioned before, Xi’an is a wonderful city, full of rich history, bright culture and beautiful sites.

Sustenance Ideas in Asia

“There is no sincerer love than the love of food.” – George Bernard Shaw

When we think of sustenance farming and urban gardening, Asia is not one of the first areas we consider. In fact, we would first think of large cities in the west whose governments are concerned with stable, clean farming and independent populations. Asian countries are not ostensibly known for governments which care much for these ideals. I had an opportunity to learn otherwise about China.

During my time here in China, I have on two separate occasions visited urban sustenance farms in both Beijing and Tianjin. There, I was able to see a true push for better farming practices and better urban lifestyles. The spirit of globalization meeting the independence of local populations can truly be felt in these areas.

There are large efforts in using less space for more produce. For this, the practice of hydroponics is being explored. Using walls as anchors, large areas of unused building sides can be turned into space for gardens on a large scale. Using space in creative new ways – like hanging gardens and dirtless gardens have proven to be successful here as well.

This seems to be catching on quickly in suburban areas around the larger Asian cities, like Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, and Xian, where the cost of living is still high but the access to fresh food is being sent into the city. The farms I was able to visit had been stable and self-sustaining areas for a few years, proving that it could be done, at least in the short term. In addition, many of the pesticides and fertilizers are being re-examined; using insects as natural pesticides and types of processed compost.

I took my trip to both of these farms last July. While it may still seem odd that China, of all places, is really becoming a popular place for urban independent farming, it started in Tianjin. Tianjin used to be an Italian territory, and it still retains much of its western heritage. Even the ideals in Tianjin are a bit different than Beijing, which is less than an hour away by train.

Whether by Western influence of the Italian history of Tianjin or China’s own ingenuity to protect itself, China is working towards making a better place for its citizens. It is slow work, and it will require changing of a few cultural norms, but I believe that this will eventually help China. The whole world should be inspired to try to do what China’s doing – make a better world agriculturally.

Thai Honeymoon

“Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” – Marthe Troly-Curtin

My wife and I decide that since we did not have the opportunity to have a honeymoon when we married, we would take a late on during the summer. We decided to go to the tropics and visit Thailand. Thailand was amazingly beautiful. Our trip went through Bangkok, then south into the jungles to the islands at Krabi.

Bangkok was larger than I had expected it to be. There were several temples and many interesting areas that showed local culture, like the night markets and the river cruises. The city as a whole gave the false first impression of being like any other large western city. While there were high rises, large shops, and chain restaurants, there were also many local places to eat and shop, not to mention the cultural shows (yes we were propositioned to see Ladyboys and Ping Pong shows).

We stayed in the Clover Hotel, overlooking a local park and part of the city. The Hotel had a bit of a mad wonderland feel, which was really cool. The pool was on the roof, and hung from the edge. The bottom on the outside was glass, which let you see the street several hundred feet below. Being afraid of heights, that took some time to swim.

After a night in Bangkok, we headed for Krabi. There we explored the jungles on elephant back, climbed to a high peak (2500m nearly straight up the mountain), and visited a few local markets. On the beaches, we visited the islands on a personal boat and went snorkeling to see reefs and tropical fish.

We ate only local Thai food while we were there. The food was much more sour than I expected. It was just as spicy as I expected. There were more noodle dishes than I had previously known, and the local diet (especially in Krabi) had more seafood than I had suspected.

What would be the first honeymoon of several we would have this year, Thailand was an unbelievably beautiful place with amazing things to do. It was unforgettable.

Hidden Army

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.” – Mark Twain

In May, I was able to visit the famed Terra Cotta Warriors. The Terra Cotta Army is a set of life-like, life-size clay warriors set to guard the tombs of ancient emperors. The sites are very well preserved. Each of the three digs of the Terra Cotta Army is now indoors with regulated atmosphere and security to keep people from disturbing the remains. There is a park built around the buildings and on the mountainside.

I was first mostly impressed by the size of the digs. I always knew about the Terra Cotta Army from books and movies, but to see it in person was awesome. The first building was the largest of the three, and it held mostly foot soldiers in long rows. The second building was the smallest, with small squadrons of archers. The third building had the cavalry and war chariots.

The recovery and preservation of these artifacts is amazing, considering everything these sites have been through. It is believed that each small chamber would have been supported with wooden wall and ceiling supports, many of which have since collapsed. Also, villagers who lived in the area before the rediscovery of the army had built many wells which had dug into some of the chambers. There are even some chambers were it is evident that small fires had helped weaken the supports which led to cave-ins.

Despite all this, there is a great collaboration to not only protect, but restore many of the pieces. There are specialists working to preserve each piece of the army. Many other specialists have been enlisted to recreate some of the broken warriors or horses. In the first building, there is a platform with a section of pieced together warriors.

Altogether, it was a wonderful experience. It was also the only thing worth mentioning about May with one exception. Toward the end of the month, I got to go to a world famous afternoon tea at the Legendale. It was another fun activity, even if I do not get to do it more often.

Rain of Cherry Blossoms

“He who does not travel does not know the value of men.” – Moorish proverb

While April showers bring May flowers where I originate, in China, Spring starts full force. I was shown what Springtime really means in Asia, and it means Cherry Blossoms. Everywhere I went there were cherry trees raining white and pink and purple flowers everywhere. It was beautiful and mystifying. Not only were the flowers falling from the sky, but there were flowers everywhere underneath, as well.

In the gardens and parks, flowers ruled – not even the grass could compete with the flowers everywhere. I am not entirely sure how this happens, nor do I truly want to know. I enjoyed the scenery everywhere. I was able to go to the very large and very spacious Olympic Forest Park. There were trees everywhere with multicolored flowers, and many types of flowers all through the park. Peach trees, cherry trees, pear trees all spread petals among tulips and roses and lilies. It was gorgeous.

Spring not only gave way to bright colors, but to warm weather, and with it, outdoor activities. The parks were loaded with performers and artists sharing their talents, some for free and some for sale. In the Temple of the Earth, there were several artists simply practicing there skills in painting. Kids were playing in the warmth, families were dancing and talking – everyone was enjoying the change from extreme cold to mild warm.

In addition to the local parks and gardens, I was also able to go to two very interesting cities – Dalian and Gubei. I visited Dalian on a business trip. There was a Biotech Convention there in which I was to take part. While I was only there for a few days, I was able to visit the city. It was beautiful, if a little colder than Beijing. It is a coastal city, with several harbors and shipwrights.

My coworkers and I had a great time, despite needing to work. We played cards on the eight hour train ride, we explored the coastline at night, and even found ourselves trying to open a really heavy door. It was a great time of bonding and fun.

Gubei is a city modelled after another mountain lake village in the south of China. It is very traditional, and even has on old Catholic mission on top of the mountain. Just like any traditional village, there were traditional Chinese arts and crafts, as well as traditional music and designs around the village. It was very cute and very nice to visit this place.

April was more than the beginning of the warm weather in Beijing, it was a new beginning of discovery for me. I started my adventures fresh with the fresh weather. I felt that anything was possible and the world can truly be explored.


Easter Flowers


March in Beijing was a month of cold wind, bright sun, beautiful flowers, and Easter. In addition to the holiday, I was able to see several wonderful sights in Beijing. I was fortunate to see the Beijing Metropolitan Zoo, the Imperial Gardens, the Temple of Heaven, and even participate in a baking class. It was a soft month of China transitioning from the bitter cold of winter to the mild of spring.

The Zoo was quite fantastic, despite the fact of being inside the already crowded city of Beijing. It was much larger than I had expected with many different types of animals. Some of the cages and enclosures for the animals were a bit smaller than expected, but most had a great area to call home. There were also several endangered species being helped in the zoo. There were programs and learning tools as well that sometimes worked with the local schools.

In addition to the Beijing Zoo, I was able to see the Temple of Heaven. This is a very prominent site for Chinese living in or visiting Beijing. This temple was important for the Chinese, and the emperor would visit this temple twice a year and pray to the sky for good harvests. There were many ceremonies including animal sacrifices, proper clothes and music, and parades by the emperor. This temple complex is wide and very beautiful.

On Easter weekend, I went to the Imperial Gardens. These gardens were once the site of a grand display of different types of architectural designs, including those from different regions in China and Asia, as well as western styles. The gardens hosted several lakes with various trees and flowers from all over the world. Although it was destroyed twice by the British and the French, it still holds its beauty. There are many ruins with greenery carving its way throughout the rubble. The lake is a perfect place for swimmers, fishers, and boating.

On Easter Day, my wife and I went to an Easter baking class. There, we learned how to make traditional European Easter breads and desserts. Although it was not all a Chinese experience, it was fun, and we learned how to make great breads from scratch. We were even awarded with a baking certificate upon completion the class.

Beijing greeted Springtime with a plethora of vibrant flowers. We celebrated this by visiting the gardens with the brightest trees and bushes.