Sustenance Ideas in Asia

“There is no sincerer love than the love of food.” – George Bernard Shaw

When we think of sustenance farming and urban gardening, Asia is not one of the first areas we consider. In fact, we would first think of large cities in the west whose governments are concerned with stable, clean farming and independent populations. Asian countries are not ostensibly known for governments which care much for these ideals. I had an opportunity to learn otherwise about China.

During my time here in China, I have on two separate occasions visited urban sustenance farms in both Beijing and Tianjin. There, I was able to see a true push for better farming practices and better urban lifestyles. The spirit of globalization meeting the independence of local populations can truly be felt in these areas.

There are large efforts in using less space for more produce. For this, the practice of hydroponics is being explored. Using walls as anchors, large areas of unused building sides can be turned into space for gardens on a large scale. Using space in creative new ways – like hanging gardens and dirtless gardens have proven to be successful here as well.

This seems to be catching on quickly in suburban areas around the larger Asian cities, like Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, and Xian, where the cost of living is still high but the access to fresh food is being sent into the city. The farms I was able to visit had been stable and self-sustaining areas for a few years, proving that it could be done, at least in the short term. In addition, many of the pesticides and fertilizers are being re-examined; using insects as natural pesticides and types of processed compost.

I took my trip to both of these farms last July. While it may still seem odd that China, of all places, is really becoming a popular place for urban independent farming, it started in Tianjin. Tianjin used to be an Italian territory, and it still retains much of its western heritage. Even the ideals in Tianjin are a bit different than Beijing, which is less than an hour away by train.

Whether by Western influence of the Italian history of Tianjin or China’s own ingenuity to protect itself, China is working towards making a better place for its citizens. It is slow work, and it will require changing of a few cultural norms, but I believe that this will eventually help China. The whole world should be inspired to try to do what China’s doing – make a better world agriculturally.

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